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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
so we don't miss anything. for what it's worth, president obama and house speaker boehner are talking. they had a nice telephone conversation. that's terrific. the first time in a week but apparently that's the headline. that's the editorial body. not much came out of it that we know of. sources say no real breakthrough. no formal negotiations. sessions are not scheduled. no back channel discussions taking place that anybody knows about at this time and as we wait for the white house briefing to begin, let's bring in wolf blitzer on this topic. there are a couple of polls that are very telling about how americans feel about congress and the president are behaving when it comes to the fiscal cliff. let me read some of these numbers for you. should obama compromise to get things done. 72% say yes. 22% say no. should the gop compromise to get things done. and take a look. 72% say yes. my question for you, wolf, i'm not sure you'll have the answer but perhaps you'll have guidance. for those democrats who say the president has a mandate because voters voted him into office while he campaig
interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan relies on $1.2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)